Summer Camp: Ready or Not

Summer’s coming! Do you know what your children will be doing while school’s out? If you have a child with a disability, there aren’t always as many options as there are for typical children.  And sometimes those options are limited to sleepaway camps. Knowing when your child (or you!) are ready for the sleepaway experience can be tricky. We spoke with one mom to find out how she knew this was the year for them!   (more…)

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Teaching Workers with Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities about Safety and Health on the Job

Many US workers lack health and safety training and workplace injuries are a serious public health problem. Employees with intellectual and developmental disabilities may be at higher risk for being hurt at work. In this article, the team at the NIOSH Safe•Skilled•Ready Workforce Program discuss the importance of having a workplace safety curriculum!

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10 Questions with LaPrice Weatherington, Transition Coordinator at John F. Kennedy School, Newark, NJ

LaPrice Weatherington is a Transition Coordinator, an author, and a mother. Her passion for helping students with IEPs transition from life in high school to life out there in the real world is inspiring to us here at ONEder. We were lucky enough to sit down with LaPrice and get her insights into why having a focused transition curriculum is so important.

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Check Us out at Urban Collaborative

Is Blended Curriculum the Best Choice for Today’s Student?

Technology in the classroom is often viewed as the great equalizer — it ensures all students have equal access to educational content. However, using technology-exclusive products can have its own challenges. During this focus group, we’ll explore these challenges, look at how to successfully use technology, and learn how blended learning may be the best solution.  (more…)

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Speech Language Pathologist Uses Basketball and Technology to Connect Kids

When Gemma White was just 13 years old, she knew she wanted to work in the world of special education. “I was involved in an integrated youth club back in England,” she explained. When she turned 18, Gemma began a program of study at University College London to become a speech language pathologist. In 2002, she moved to the United States and worked at The McCarton Center for Developmental Pediatrics. Gemma now runs her own private practice, A Spoonful of Sugar, in New York. (more…)

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